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Piracy and options for the consumer - Feb. 13, 2004

Piracy and options for the consumer - Feb. 13, 2004

"To put it succinctly, why would I buy a 400-peso album if the next store is selling it for 40 pesos? Worse, why would I buy a 10,000-peso piece of software if one is available for 100 pesos? Or a 3,000-peso video game if one is available for 80 pesos?"

I am just plain sick of this. Yes, the article is a bit old, but when you write something this irresponsible (even for an editorial) you have to think twice before doing so. It just sickens me that he makes a point, and even justifies the point he makes by saying that "why should I do this legal thing, when I can do this illegal thing?".

This is what's going on in the minds of most of the people in the country -- and I can't blame them, not everyone can afford everything he/she wants. However, I do not understand why since you can't afford it, you'll find ways (mostly illegal) to get it? Why can't you just deal with the fact that hey, you don't have enough resources to acquire that something you want, and that you have to work for what you can get?

Who wants go get ripped off? Nobody. Therefore, do unto others what you want others do unto you. If you rip someone off, better be prepared to get ripped off one way or another -- the very popular and spiritually logical rule of karma. So if you can't afford that piece of software, then sorry bub, you just have to work for it -- and it's just right that when someone does something illegal like buying a pirated copy of that software's installer, he/she must pay. No one is above the law, and the law is made for everyone's sake.

I have no objections to the law (although I haven't read the whole law yet), but from what I understand, it really makes sense.

I'm no rich person, but since I know that, I do my share to not rip anyone off -- because I don't want anyone to rip me off too.

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